Multilingual Business Communication

November 2, 2008

What’s in a name?

Filed under: crisis communication, Ruth Broekaert — Tags: , , , , , — meertaligebedrijfscommunicatie @ 12:34 pm

The top of the Fortis bank is considering to change the name ‘Fortis’ once the merger with BNP Paribas will have been completed. This was announced last week by top man Peter van de Kerckhove. Up until  now the Fortis-board has insisted that their name shouldn’t be changed because they felt it was still a strong brand, but apparently they have now altered their opinion on the matter. I think this is less of a  home made decision  than they make it seem, considering the  influences of the media.

Next to the overall reporting on the financial crisis, and the role of Fortis therein, several newspaper articles and internet sites have been popping up concerning the strength, or better, the weakness of the brand itself.

Some articles focussed on the discontent of Anderlecht, a Dutch football team which is sponsored by Fortis. Anderlecht’s chairman, Roger vanden Stock announced that the team doesn’t want to play with the brand, nor the logo, on their shirts anymore. They find that the name ‘Fortis’ now has gained a ‘loser’-connotation, which of course isn’t exactly flattering out on the field.

Fortis has also stopped using their slogan ‘Here today… where tomorrow?’ because the slogan has widely been made fun of on the internet. ‘Here today…gone tomorrow!’ has become a well known internet joke.

A particular YouTube-film has also received some media attention during the last couple of days. The film portrays in a humorous way the weak financial state of Fortis and its liquidity issues.

So… what’s in a name? I guess it depends on what’s cooking in the media…

Ruth Broekaert

http://www.nieuwsblad.be/Article/Detail.aspx?ArticleID=DMF25102008_055

http://www.standaard.be/Artikel/Detail.aspx?artikelId=EI22C07O&kanaalid=39

http://www.demorgen.be/dm/nl/996/Economie/article/detail/434523/2008/09/30/Fortis-schrapt-slogan-Here-today-Where-tomorrow.dhtml

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1 Comment »

  1. The top of the Fortis bank is considering to change the name ‘Fortis’ once the merge [merger] with BNP Paribas will have been completed, this was announced last week by top man Peter van de Kerckhove [This is a run-on sentence: no linking word between the two parts, just a comma] .Up untill [until] now the Fortis-board has insisted that their name shouldn’t be changed because they felt it was still a strong brand, <i< [insert a linking word] apparently they have now altered their opinion on the matter. This might have happened under the influence of the media.

    Next to the overall reporting on the financial crisis, and the role of Fortis therein, several newspaper articles and internet sites have been popping up concerning the strength, or better, the weakness of the brand itself.

    Some articles focussed on the discontent of Anderlecht, a Dutch football team which is sponsored by Fortis. Anderlecht [Anderlecht’s] chairman, Roger vanden Stock announced that the team doesn’t want to play with the brand, nor the logo, on their shirts anymore. They find that the name ‘Fortis’ now has gained a ‘loser’-connotation, which of course isn’t exactly flattering out on the field.

    Fortis has also stopped using their slogan ‘Here today… where tomorrow?’ because the slogan has widely been made fun of on the internet. ‘Here today…gone tomorrow!’ has become a well known internet joke.

    A particular YouTube-film has also received some media attention during the last couple of days. The film portrays in a humorous way the weak financial state of Fortis and its liquidity issues.

    You have found a good topic, but you have not succeeded in analysing it in-depth. Right now you have an amusing anecdote. Try being a bit more critical

    Marilyn Michels

    Comment by meertaligebedrijfscommunicatie — November 16, 2008 @ 1:31 pm


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