Multilingual Business Communication

November 1, 2008

Telework: death of a nomadic warrior?

Filed under: employee communication, Karen Decabooter — Tags: , — meertaligebedrijfscommunicatie @ 5:31 pm

                                                                  These days, all around the world about 100 million employees are working at home, instead of commuting to the office every day. This phenomenon, called ‘teleworking‘, has consequences for the communication between employers and employees as well as for family communication.

On the one hand, teleworking can be a godsend for some people since it reduces travel time, pollution and office costs. On the other hand, it can turn into a nightmare for others since they are working more hours to ensure colleagues that they are not taking advantage of the flexible system. Research from a business school in Nottingham confirms that teleworking disturbs family communication since other family members e.g. have to give up rooms for office use and since the teleworker can be disturbed by nagging children.

Moreover, teleworking can also lead to communication problems between employers and employees because information exchange and measuring performance cannot be as effective as it is in conventional, face-to-face, working environments. The lack of social contact may turn teleworkers into isolated desk potatoes. Managers could try to keep the team connected by scheduling staff meetings and by using videoconferencing and collaboration software.

 Technologies such as Blackberry, Wi-Fi spots, … promote ‘nomadism’. This term refers to the fact that any place, e.g. a coffee-house, can serve as an office. Separating work and leisure becomes more difficult. Think of couples who are negotiating whether blackberries are allowed in the bedroom or not. Contrary to normal working days that end when people leave the office, a nomad’s working day never stops. In my opinion, commuting and the search for suitable child care are worth the trouble…

 (Karen Decabooter)

           

 

 

 

Advertisements

1 Comment »

  1. Good choice of topic, but it takes a long time to become clear why this is linked to employee communication. Also try to include your links in your text as hyperlinks.

    These days, about 100 million employees globally [these days, all around the world about 100 million employees] are working at home, instead of commuting to the main office of the company every day. This phenomenon, called ‘teleworking’, has advantages as well as disadvantages.

    On the one hand, teleworking relieves traffic congestion and pollution. It also involves savings on travel time and office costs and it raises productivity. Moreover, companies can recruit talented people who don’t want to commute and who want freedom and autonomy with respect to working hours.

    On the other hand, settings tasks, measuring performance and information exchange cannot be as effective as it is in conventional working environments where people can communicate face-to-face. Because of the shortage of social contact with colleagues and supervisors, teleworkers may suffer from isolation and get fewer promotions. This may also lead to lower [less] group cohesiveness and lower [less] loyalty towards the company. Managers could try to keep the team connected by scheduling staff meetings and social network events. Communication between teleworkers is also facilitated by collaboration software, virtual private networks, videoconferencing, …

    Technologies such as Blackberry, Wi-Fi spots, … not only made it possible to work at home, but also to work <i< [made it possible to work not only at home, but also from remote locations] from remote locations e.g. coffee-houses. The danger of ‘nomadism’ is that almost any place can serve as an office and that separating work and leisure becomes more difficult. Think of couples who are negotiating whether blackberries are allowed in the bedroom or not. Working days used to end when people left the office. But when does a nomad’s working day stop?

    Try to let your personal opinion shine through a bit more.

    Marilyn Michels

    Comment by meertaligebedrijfscommunicatie — November 16, 2008 @ 4:33 pm


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: