Multilingual Business Communication

November 1, 2008

Boss, embrace Facebook!

Filed under: employee communication, Sander Laridon — Tags: , , — meertaligebedrijfscommunicatie @ 5:51 pm

Companies should not dismiss employees who use social networking sites such as Facebook and Bebo at work as merely time-wasters, a Demos study suggests. Far from it! According to Peter Bradwell, a Demos researcher, Facebook and the like “are part of the way in which people communicate which they find intuitive”. Therefore, Facebook can’t be banned and could even boost productivity, innovation and create a more democratic working environment.

More work-specific social networks, such as LinkedIn, have already conquered their place in companies. But there is also a place for the likes of Facebook, Bebo and MySpace, said Peter Bradwell. According to Mr Turrel, chief executive of Imaginatik, which develops networking software, “being able to see a photo of colleagues, or knowing what they are up to, can be incredibly useful for businesses, especially if a firm employs thousands of people.”

Mobile phone and broadband firm Orange, which commissioned the research, is currently building its own in-house social networking platform. “The profile and significance of social networking is increasing now, because of the proliferation of new technologies that enable us to connect to each other in our personal and professional lives,” says Robert Ainger, Corporate Director of Orange.

Still, this doesn’t mean that employees and employers should use social networks without limits. The authors of the Demos study say that clear guidelines need to be set out about appropriate use of social networking. Robert Ainger suggests that “it is also good for companies to be aware of the tensions and look at deploying practical guidelines which will protect the positive impact of networks, not hamper it.”

For further information, see http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/business/7695716.stm and http://www.theinquirer.net/gb/inquirer/news/2008/10/29/facebook-et-deemed-working.

(Sander Laridon)

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3 Comments »

  1. I like your choice of topic and your writing style. I would like to see a bit more personal input, though.

    Companies should not dismiss employees who use social networking sites such as Facebook and Bebo at work as merely time-wasters, a Demos study suggests. Far from it! According to Peter Bradwell, a Demos researcher, Facebook and the like “are part of the way in which people communicate which they find intuitive [confusing relative sentences] ”. Therefore, Facebook can’t be banned and could even boost productivity, innovation and create a more democratic working environment.

    More work-specific social networks, such as LinkedIn, have already conquered their place in companies. But there is also a place for the likes of Facebook, Bebo and MySpace, [use quotation marks] said Peter Bradwell. According to Mr Turrel, chief executive of Imaginatik, which [who, or are you referring to imaginatik? a bit unclear] develops networking software, “being able to see a photo of colleagues, or knowing what they are up to, can be incredibly useful for businesses, especially if a firm employs thousands of people.”

    Mobile phone and broadband firm Orange, which commissioned the research, is currently building its own in-house social networking platform. “The profile and significance of social networking is increasing now, because of the proliferation of new technologies that enable us to connect to each other in our personal and professional lives,” says Robert Ainger, Corporate Director of Orange.

    Still, this doesn’t mean that employees and employers should use social networks without limits. The authors of the Demos study say that clear guidelines need to be set out about appropriate use of social networking. Robert Ainger suggests that “it is also good for companies to be aware of the tensions and look at deploying practical guidelines which will protect the positive impact of networks, not hamper it.”

    Marilyn Michels

    Comment by meertaligebedrijfscommunicatie — November 16, 2008 @ 4:14 pm

  2. Especially in the communication sector, I think it would be contradicting to ban Facebook. The significance of social networking is increasing now and enables for example employees to connect to each other in their personal and professional lives. The advertising agency Duval Guillaume has not only created a Facebook group for their employees worldwide and are encouraging their employees to actively be part of social networks. They even look for talented people (to join their company) via social networking websites exclusively.

    Jana Mahieu

    Comment by meertaligebedrijfscommunicatie — April 9, 2009 @ 3:57 pm

  3. Companies can’t avoid social media as they used to do. On the contrary, they should embrace it.

    More and more people are currently using Facebook. Today, the website has reached a total number of 200 million users. Every day, there are about 500.000 new users.

    Especially people of 35 and beyond have found their way to Facebook. The social network site has declared that they are going to launch special campaigns to attract people in their fifties too. They are also looking for special options for companies. By presenting the different opportunities companies can create by using Facebook, they hope companies will cave in easier.

    More information on the special position Facebook has acquired in society and professional life can be found on http://www.demorgen.be/dm/nl/991/Multimedia/article/detail/813504/2009/04/09/Facebook-heeft-200-miljoen-leden.dhtml.

    Comment by Laura Moerman — April 10, 2009 @ 11:06 am


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