Multilingual Business Communication

October 26, 2008

The power of the customer

Filed under: employee communication, marketing communication, Valérie Debrauwere — meertaligebedrijfscommunicatie @ 3:00 pm

In the context of blogging, consumers are now being referred to as “powerful monsters” by Sjoukje Smedts in “Trends”. This means that they are more and more actively trying to take over the role of marketers. It is they who can make or break a brand. For instance in the case of Dell (whose blog was mentioned in an earlier post by Geert Jacobs) one single blogger managed to make the stock ratings drop by spreading tons of negative gossip about the brand.

Swedish marketing phenomenon Stefan Engeseth warns companies about the importance of listening to their supporters. Not doing so could harm one’s own brand. In other words companies must understand and learn about the benefits of staying in touch with their customers. That way they might even be able to take advantage of the ideas brought forward by fans. The iPod for example initially wasn’t invented by Apple itself but actually came to life thanks to the efforts of an outsider.

Thus marketers should work together with consumers to overpower their competitors. Engeseth advises companies to employ managers who are already in contact with some bloggers. The key-aspect is to try and find ‘the leader of the pack’ of the blogging community. They should get him on their side since he’s the one all the others listen to. A productive exchange program could spring where on the one hand the company gets the support of the ‘leading blogger’ and he on the other hand gets that little extra piece of product information that makes the other bloggers look at him in awe.

source: “De kracht van de klant” by Sjoukje Smedts in Trends, 16 oktober 2008, p. 110-112

(Valérie Debrauwere)

edit: Companies should acknowledge this power of the customer and embrace the new phenomenon of blogging, to draw out as much benefit as they can. In any case this can only be to their advantage. [In response of the comment I have added an additional source giving companies information on how to harness the marketing power of blogs.]

 

Advertisements

1 Comment »

  1. In the context of blogging, consumers are now being referred to as “powerful monsters” by Sjoukje Smedts in “Trends”. This means that they are more and more actively trying to take over the role of marketers. It is they who can make or break a brand. For instance in the case of Dell (whose blog was mentioned in an earlier post by Geert Jacobs) one single blogger managed to make the stock ratings drop by spreading tons of negative gossip about the brand.

    Swedish marketing phenomenon Stefan Engeseth warns companies about the importance of listening to their supporters. Not doing so could harm one’s own brand. In other words companies must understand and learn about the benefits of staying in touch with their customers. That way they might even be able to take advantage of the ideas brought forward by fans. The iPod for example initially wasn’t invented by Apple itself [,] but actually came to life thanks to the efforts of an outsider.

    Thus marketers should work together with consumers to overpower their competitors. Engeseth advises companies to employ managers who are already in contact with some bloggers. The key-aspect is to try and find ‘the leader of the pack’ of the blogging community. They should get him on their side since he’s the one all the others listen to. A productive exchange program could spring where on the one hand the company gets the support of the ‘leading blogger’ and he on the other hand gets that little extra piece of product information that makes the other bloggers look at him in awe.

    Very good topic choice, but this belongs also in the employee communication part. You have a double topic. I do think that you could have used a wider variety of sources to add some dimension to your post. This would also reflect your ability to think critically.

    Marilyn Michels

    Comment by meertaligebedrijfscommunicatie — November 16, 2008 @ 6:53 pm


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: